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Catamergus kickapoo

Pellucid Solomonís seal aphid

On this page: Identification & Distribution Other aphids on the same host

Identification & Distribution

Adult apterae of Catamergus kickapoo (see first picture below) are whitish green with dusky brown tips to the femora, tibiae, base and terminal process of antennal segment VI; the tarsi and apices of the siphunculi are dark. The antennal tubercles are well-developed with their inner faces divergent. The median frontal tubercle is not developed, so that head has U- or V-shaped frontal sinus in dorsal view. The siphunculi have a subapical zone of polygonal reticulation with several rows of closed cells; the siphunculi are 0.13-0.19 times the body length and 1.9-2.6 × the length of the second hind tarsal segment (HT II) (cf. Macrosiphum insularis and Macrosiphum euphorbiae, which have siphunculi 0.21-0.35 times the body length and 3.0-6.5 times HT II). The cauda is triangular with 3 hairs on each side. The body length of adult apterae is 1.9-2.2 mm. Immatures (see second picture below) resemble the adult apterae, but with shorter or no cauda, and with entirely pale siphunculi.

Note: Catamergus kickapoo was first described by Hottes & Frison (1931).

Both images above by permission, copyright Claude Pilon, all rights reserved.

Image above by permission, copyright Claude Pilon, all rights reserved.

Catamergus kickapoo only feeds on the undersides of leaves of Polygonatum species. Their light coloration makes them easy to detect on the lower sides of the green leaves of their host plant. Sexual forms with oviparae and alate males develop in August-September. Catamergus kickapoo is found in eastern USA and Canada.

 

Other aphids on the same host

Primary host

Catamergus kickapoo occurs on 2 species of Polygonatum (Polygonatum biflorum, Polygonatum pubescens).

  • Blackman & Eastop list 2 species of aphid as feeding on great Solomon's seal (Polygonatum biflorum =Polygonatum caniculatum) worldwide, and provide formal identification keys (Show World list). Of those aphid species, Baker (2015) lists none as occurring in Britain (Show British list).

  • Blackman & Eastop list only 1 species of aphid as feeding on hairy Solomon's seal (Polygonatum pubescens) worldwide, and provide formal identification keys (Show World list). Of those aphid species, Baker (2015) lists none as occurring in Britain (Show British list).

  • Blackman & Eastop list 8 species of aphid as feeding on Polygonatum spp. including Polygonatum ◊ hybridum (= Polygonatum multiflorum, garden Solomon's seal) worldwide, and provide formal identification keys (Show World list). Of those aphid species, Baker (2015) lists 5 as occurring in Britain (Show British list).

    The images below show one of those species, Macrosiphum euphorbiae, and flowers of the Polygonatum sp. that it and its nymphs were feeding on.

    Acknowledgements

    We are especially grateful to Claude Pilon for pictures of Catamergus kickapoo (for more of her excellent pictures see).

    We have made provisional identifications from high resolution photos of living specimens, along with host plant identity. In the great majority of cases, identifications have been confirmed by microscopic examination of preserved specimens. We have used the keys and species accounts of Palmer (1952), Hottes & Frison (1960) & Footit & Maw (1997) as well as Blackman & Eastop (1994) and Blackman & Eastop (2006). We fully acknowledge these authors as the source for the (summarized) taxonomic information we have presented. Any errors in identification or information are ours alone, and we would be very grateful for any corrections. For assistance on the terms used for aphid morphology we suggest the figure provided by Blackman & Eastop (2006).

    Useful weblinks

    References

    • Foottit, R. & Maw, E. (1997). Aphids (Homoptera: Aphidoidea) of the Yukon. pp. 387-404 in H.V. Danks and J.A. Downes (Eds.), Insects of the Yukon. Biological Survey of Canada (Terrestrial Arthropods), Ottawa. 1034 pp. © 1997. Full text

    • Hottes, F.C. & Frison, T.H. (1931). The Plant Lice, or Aphiidae, of Illinois. Illinois Natural History Survey Bulletin 19(3), 123-447. Full text

    • Palmer, M.A. (1952). Aphids of the Rocky Mountain Region: including primarily Colorado and Utah, but also bordering area composed of southern Wyoming, southeastern Idaho and northern New Mexico. Thomas Say Foundation, Denver. Full text