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Aphidinae : Macrosiphini : Macrosiphum badium
 

 

Macrosiphum badium

False Solomon's-seal aphid

On this page: Identification & Distribution Other aphids on the same host

Identification & Distribution

Adult apterae of Macrosiphum badium are dark reddish brown. The antennae are brown, except for the base of segment III which is pale. Antennal segment III is imbricated throughout, with 1-5 secondary rhinaria basally (cf. Macrosiphum pechumani, which has 11-25 rhinaria on that segment arranged in a row over most of the length). The longest hair on segment III is 0.50-0.77 times as long as basal width of that segment. The antennal tubercles are large, and somewhat diverging. The rostrum reaches to the mesocoxae, to slightly beyond, with the apical rostral segment (RIV+V) 1.15-1.48 times the second hind tarsal segment (HTII) (cf. Macrosiphum insularis which has RIV+V shorter than HTII). The legs are uniformly dusky to light brown, except for the tips of the tibiae, and all of the tarsi, which are dark brown. The entire abdominal tergum is strongly sclerotic, and often corrugated. Abdominal tergites II-V usually have small marginal tubercles. The siphunculi are dusky except for the extreme base, which is pale, and the apex, which is dark (cf. Macrosiphum pechumani which has dark siphunculi, and cf. Macrosiphum euphorbiae, which has mainly pale siphunculi). The siphunculi are 0.86-1.13 times antennal segment III, and 2.1 times the caudal length, with about 5 rows of reticulations. The cauda is dusky, with 6-8 hairs. The body length of adult Macrosiphum badium apterae is 2.3-3.1 mm

First image above copyright Andrew Jensen,second image Walter Siegmund,
both under a creative common licence.

The alate vivipara of Macrosiphum badium has not yet been described, since the only specimen available to Jensen (2000) had underdeveloped wings and various apteriform characteristics. However, the number of rhinaria on antennal segment III of this specimen (9) suggested this species has relatively few rhinaria in the alatae.

Like many other Macrosiphum species, Macrosiphum badium is monoecious holocyclic. It feeds on Maianthemum species (Maianthemum racemosa, Maianthemum stellata, Maianthemum dilatatum) in the Liliaceae. Jensen (2000) describes the life cycle. Egg hatch occurs during March as the plants are unfolding. Reproduction continues until June, when the apterae present at the time mature, and enter what appears to be a reproductive diapause through the summer. These apterae settle either among the fruits, when present, or on the lower leaves. Reproduction begins again in September, usually on the lower or most yellow leaves. The apterae that survive the summer give birth to oviparae, and both alate and apterous males. Eggs are laid below the surface of the soil along the plant stem. This aphid is known from several western states (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana) in the USA.

 

Other aphids on the same host

Macrosiphum badium has been recorded on 3 Maianthemum species (Maianthemum dilatatum, Maianthemum racemosum, Maianthemum stellatum).

Blackman & Eastop list 2 species of aphid as feeding on false lily of the valley (Maianthemum dilatatum) worldwide, and provide formal identification keys (Show World list). Of those aphid species, Baker (2015) lists 1 as occurring in Britain (Show British list).

Blackman & Eastop list 2 species of aphid as feeding on false Solomon's-seal (Maianthemum racemosum) worldwide, and provide formal identification keys (Show World list). Of those aphid species, Baker (2015) lists 1 as occurring in Britain (Show British list).

Blackman & Eastop list 3 species of aphid as feeding on star-flowered lily-of-the-valley (Maianthemum stellatum) worldwide, and provide formal identification keys (Show World list). Of those aphid species, Baker (2015) lists none as occurring in Britain (Show British list).

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Andrew Jensen and Walter Siegmund for making their images of Macrosiphum badium and Maianthemum racemosum respectively available for use under a creative commons licence.

We have used the species account given by Jensen (2000), together with information from Roger Blackman & Victor Eastop in Aphids on Worlds Plants. We fully acknowledge these authors and those listed in the reference sections as the source for the (summarized) taxonomic information we have presented. Any errors in information are ours alone, and we would be very grateful for any corrections. For assistance on the terms used for aphid morphology we suggest the figure provided by Blackman & Eastop (2006).

Useful weblinks

References

  • Jensen, A.S. (2000). Eight new species of Macrosiphum from Western North America, with notes on four other poorly known species. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Washington 102(2), 427-472. Full text